Monday, April 2, 2018

The Essentials of Theory U - Core Principles and Applications by C. Otto Scharmer



Over ten issues ago Theory U was published, and it was over 500 pages that contained numerous tables, graphs, and other insights. The author C. Otto Scharmer just released a condensed version of his original book called The Essentials of Theory U – Core Principles and Applications. This version of the book is only 157 pages and has some great insights for leaders and is the perfect size with wisdom to keep handy as you meet daily challenges.

Theory U encourages us to look at the world with fresh eyes. We need to be more cognoscente of how we pay attention to if at all, problems to avoid looking at everything as a “blind spot”. We need to be open to listening to our inner selves and be aware of any blind spots so that we can make change that sticks and benefits others.

There are three key elements to Theory U:

1.    Develop a framework for recognizing blind spots with our leadership and any system changes.
2.    Find a method for implementing an awareness-based shift that encompasses processes, principles, and other outside forces.
3.    Develop a new “narrative” for societal changes and impacting all of our mental and institutional operating systems.

The book thoroughly explains the Theory U and delves into the various issues that happen with blind spots and how it impacts us as leaders. Scharmer offers up some actionable methods and ideas to help leaders change and take action looking beyond blind spots. I was uplifted at the author’s framework to help me develop a better awareness and be open to alternative possibilities. We need to be more present while sensing everything around us and ask for more openness and understanding from those around us.

The Essentials of Theory U is a useful paired down version of the original book. It’s a book that you will want to read carefully to pick out which nuggets will assist you in your daily challenges. It may be beneficial to take a few notes to reference and it’s a more substantial read than most of us may be accustomed to reading but well worth it.